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Strong Distrust of WhatsApp leads to Blind Exit of Millions of Users

By |January 19th, 2021|Categories: Economy, Science4Data, Technology|

 

See our full analysis here: Forbes

 

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Not all press is good press, and even less so when your brand gets dragged down by another tainted entity. This was the lesson learned by WhatsApp when it announced a new privacy agreement last week. The backlash was so swift that it’s main competitor Signal crashed due to a vast influx of new users departing the Facebook owned messenger service.

Our article analysis shows just how toxic WhatsApp has become. WhatsApp is the largest entity in our Word Cloud and deep red to show it’s negative contextual sentiment. WhatsApp is not the only loser from this debacle, other Facebook properties Instagram and Messenger are just as negative, but not as prominent throughout the article. However, according to the author, these services pose a greater risk to privacy than the lead figure in the piece. 

This is a great demonstration of how media coverage can have such a strong influence over customer sentiment. WhatsApp faced the brunt of the public backlash because it’s name was most prominent – and its competitors gained while being neutral entities themselves (Signal and Telegram are featured in our word cloud in small letters and with neutral contextual sentiment). Consumers are almost blinded by their disdain for the Facebook product without discerning which competitor is best.

Social media backlash has been simmering for quite a time now, and even more so with recent news on platforms banning the outgoing U.S. President. In the case of this article, it would seem that the winner of this backlash is anything that’s not WhatsApp.

Read our full article analysis here.

Photo by AARN GIRI on Unsplash

Inc.com: How Signal Became the Most Popular App in the World Overnight, and Why It Matters

By |January 17th, 2021|Categories: Article Analysis|

2021-01-16 04:00:00, Jason Aten, Inc.com

Content Categorization
/Internet & Telecom/Mobile & Wireless/Mobile Apps & Add-Ons
/Computers & Electronics

Word Count:
780

Words/Sentence:
20

Reading Time:
5.20 min

Reading Quality:
Adept

Readability:
13th to 15th

Media Sentiment
Proprietary sentiment analysis on both the headline and body text of the article. Sentiment scores range from -1 (very negative sentiment) to 1 (very positive sentiment).
RCS Analysis
Relative scoring for Risk, Crisis, and Security language within the article.
Risk Score
Scoring based on the composite risk, security and crisis language within an article compared to a baseline of historic analysis across thousands of diverse articles.
PESTEL Scope
Analysis of article orientation across the PESTEL macro-environmental analysis framework. Learn more about PESTEL.
Entity Word Cloud
Key people, places, organizations and events referenced in the article, weighted by frequency and colored based on contextual sentiment.
Auto Summary
Condensing key features of the article based on salience analysis. Helpful for “gisting” the article in a time crunch.

One major difference, however, is that Signal's privacy protections are good enough that when the company was required to hand over information about a user by a grand jury subpoena, the only information available was the date the account was created, and the date of last activity.

Finally, WhatsApp updated its privacy policy earlier this week, and required users to accept that it shares some information with Facebook before continuing to use the app.

At that time it was a reflection of the app's popularity among activists, journalists, and other security-minded users who value the fact that Signal messages are never stored on the platform's servers and can only be decrypted by the intended end-user.

Featured VideoForget Big-Picture: Why You Should Build Mental Toughness Through Small StepsAs a result, people flocked to the encrypted messaging app, which is backed by the non-profit Signal Foundation.

According to Sensor Tower, which provides mobile app analytics, Signal was downloaded 17.8 million times during the week of January 5.

Keywords

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Article Analysis is at the foundation of powerful media monitoring and insights. Learn what you can build with powerful curated search engines, real-time listening and trend analysis on the topics, markets and companies critical to your organization.

BBC News: WhatsApp changes: Signal messaging platform restored after surge prompts outage

By |January 17th, 2021|Categories: Article Analysis|

2021-01-17 21:05:10, , BBC News

Content Categorization
/Internet & Telecom/Email & Messaging
/Computers & Electronics
/Internet & Telecom/Mobile & Wireless

Word Count:
488

Words/Sentence:
20

Reading Time:
3.25 min

Reading Quality:
Adept

Readability:
13th to 15th

Media Sentiment
Proprietary sentiment analysis on both the headline and body text of the article. Sentiment scores range from -1 (very negative sentiment) to 1 (very positive sentiment).
RCS Analysis
Relative scoring for Risk, Crisis, and Security language within the article.
Risk Score
Scoring based on the composite risk, security and crisis language within an article compared to a baseline of historic analysis across thousands of diverse articles.
PESTEL Scope
Analysis of article orientation across the PESTEL macro-environmental analysis framework. Learn more about PESTEL.
Entity Word Cloud
Key people, places, organizations and events referenced in the article, weighted by frequency and colored based on contextual sentiment.
Auto Summary
Condensing key features of the article based on salience analysis. Helpful for “gisting” the article in a time crunch.

image copyrightReutersimage captionSignal is a free, encrypted messenger service – and a rival to WhatsApp and TelegramMessaging platform Signal says it has resolved technical problems which have hampered its service over the past few days, after seeing a rush of new users.

According to data from analytics firm Sensor Tower, Signal was downloaded 246,000 times worldwide in the week before WhatsApp announced the change on 4 January, and 8.8 million times the week after.

However, it does include:phone number and other information provided on registration (such as name)information about the user's phone, including make, model, and mobile companyinternet protocol (IP) addresses, which indicate the location of a user's internet connectionsany payments and financial transactions made over WhatsApp

Both Signal and Telegram, another free-to-use encrypted messaging app, have benefited from discontent sparked by WhatsApp's updated terms and conditions.

The company has seen a huge uptick in interest since its rival WhatsApp unveiled new privacy terms last week.

Keywords

Interested in Learning More?

Article Analysis is at the foundation of powerful media monitoring and insights. Learn what you can build with powerful curated search engines, real-time listening and trend analysis on the topics, markets and companies critical to your organization.

Forbes: Why You Should Stop Using Your Facebook Messenger App

By |January 17th, 2021|Categories: Article Analysis|

2021-01-16 00:00:00, Zak Doffman, Forbes

Content Categorization
/Internet & Telecom/Email & Messaging

Word Count:
1731

Words/Sentence:
21

Reading Time:
11.54 min

Reading Quality:
Adept

Readability:
13th to 15th

Media Sentiment
Proprietary sentiment analysis on both the headline and body text of the article. Sentiment scores range from -1 (very negative sentiment) to 1 (very positive sentiment).
RCS Analysis
Relative scoring for Risk, Crisis, and Security language within the article.
Risk Score
Scoring based on the composite risk, security and crisis language within an article compared to a baseline of historic analysis across thousands of diverse articles.
PESTEL Scope
Analysis of article orientation across the PESTEL macro-environmental analysis framework. Learn more about PESTEL.
Entity Word Cloud
Key people, places, organizations and events referenced in the article, weighted by frequency and colored based on contextual sentiment.
Auto Summary
Condensing key features of the article based on salience analysis. Helpful for “gisting” the article in a time crunch.

WhatsApp Vs Messenger

Apple App Store 'Privacy Labels'

In reality, the WhatsApp debacle has distracted attention away from just how bad Messenger's invasion of your privacy is.

SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Prompted by an unfortunate series of events, some woefully mismanaged PR, and a widely misreported story, WhatsApp is now damaged.

But, as things stand, Messenger does monitor content, and you'll note that "health and fitness," "sensitive info" and "financial info" are among the mass of user data fields it admits to collecting through its Messenger platform.

"People should be able to communicate securely and privately with friends and loved ones without anyone-including Facebook-listening to or monitoring their conversations," Facebook's Jay Sullivan told a senate committee in 2019.

MORE FROM FORBESSignal Vs Telegram-3 Things You Need To Know Before You Quit WhatsAppBy Zak Doffman"Your personal messages are protected by end-to-end encryption," WhatsApp emphasized in its fightback.

Keywords
iPhone 12 Pro, google rcs, WhatsApp update, android 11, apple iMessage, encryption, sms, iPhone 12 Pro max, apple Facebook, iPhone update, WhatsApp security, android messages, apple privacy label, signal messenger, Facebook messenger, iOS 14.3

Interested in Learning More?

Article Analysis is at the foundation of powerful media monitoring and insights. Learn what you can build with powerful curated search engines, real-time listening and trend analysis on the topics, markets and companies critical to your organization.

CIA Rebrand Sparks Conversation, But Does Little to Shift Perceptions

By |January 13th, 2021|Categories: Marketing, Politics, Science4Data|

 

See our full analysis here: The New York Times

 

Download our one page MediaSignal overview, learn how we do it!

Rebranding for commercial products is often a tactic used to revitalize, re-energize and re-orient public perception of an established entity. It can be a success, shifting an organization’s image in a positive light, or a failure, in that can lead to confusion amongst consumers who may not recognize the brand they once loved. However, we don’t often hear about public sector rebranding. This was not the case with the recent website rebrand effort by the Central Intelligence Agency. 

Our article analysis of The New York Times’ article on the CIA’s rebrand reveals a positive, if not tepid, response to the agency’s new website design. The article’s headline provides a relatively strong positive media sentiment, whereas its content has a more muted response. This could be due to the fact that the CIA’s website rebrand draws inspiration from sources that do inspire a positive response: Soylent and the online publication, The Intercept. Our entity word cloud shows these two brand names positively coloured although lightly weighted for frequency of mention in the article. 

The positive sentiment does transfer slightly to the CIA’s new site, with its url, CIA.gov, appearing positively in the entity word cloud – but it’s frequency even smaller than Soylent’s and The Intercept’s appearances. This positive occurrence seems limited to the website itself, with the largest entity in our word cloud being the Central Intelligence Agency but as a decidedly a neutral entity. The visual language of a rebrand can only do so much to overcome an established brand’s identity, especially one that has been accused of destabilizing governments worldwide.

No doubt the media coverage of the rebrand is being tracked by the agency, but from our analysis the media’s interest is most-likely a flash in the pan, not an indicator of a radical shift in the CIA’s public perception.

Read our full article analysis here.

The Agency’s old logo provided by: “CIA Logo” by theglobalpanorama is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

The New York Times: Is Graphic Design the C.I.A.’s Passion?

By |January 12th, 2021|Categories: Article Analysis|

2021-01-08 00:00:00, Ezra Marcus, The New York Times

Content Categorization
/Business & Industrial/Advertising & Marketing/Public Relations

Word Count:
873

Words/Sentence:
26

Reading Time:
5.82 min

Reading Quality:
Adept

Readability:
13th to 15th

Media Sentiment
Proprietary sentiment analysis on both the headline and body text of the article. Sentiment scores range from -1 (very negative sentiment) to 1 (very positive sentiment).
RCS Analysis
Relative scoring for Risk, Crisis, and Security language within the article.
Risk Score
Scoring based on the composite risk, security and crisis language within an article compared to a baseline of historic analysis across thousands of diverse articles.
PESTEL Scope
Analysis of article orientation across the PESTEL macro-environmental analysis framework. Learn more about PESTEL.
Entity Word Cloud
Key people, places, organizations and events referenced in the article, weighted by frequency and colored based on contextual sentiment.
Auto Summary
Condensing key features of the article based on salience analysis. Helpful for “gisting” the article in a time crunch.

With CIA.gov's black-and-white color scheme, photography and graphics, we want to pique the interest of talented applicants and provide a modern, relatable experience," said Nicole De Haay, a spokeswoman for the agency, in a phone interview.

Others compared it to the look of The Intercept, an online publication known for its reporting on the C.I.A., as well as marketing materials for brands like Urban Outfitters."C.I.A's mission is unlike any other, and our website reflects it.

"People were already living a fantasy before I posted it, saying that I had made the CIA branding, why not take their fantasy further and say I made it?""I think its cool that they were so inspired by the Soylent branding I did in 2013," he added, jokingly.

CIA.govThis week, the Central Intelligence Agency unveiled a new design for its website, CIA.gov, which wouldn't have been news if the site had stuck to the formal signifiers of government authority: dense bureaucratic text, link directories, declarative headers, nothing too fancy.

Platforms online are games played through the attention economy – authorship and sincerity is murky as it is," Mr. Ripps wrote in an email when asked what inspired his post.

Keywords
Social Media, CIA, Ryder Ripps, Logos, marketing, Computers and the Internet, Design, advertising, Logo, Tech Industry, Spying and Intelligence Agencies

Interested in Learning More?

Article Analysis is at the foundation of powerful media monitoring and insights. Learn what you can build with powerful curated search engines, real-time listening and trend analysis on the topics, markets and companies critical to your organization.

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